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jazeera reporting that the ceasefire is going to be announced this evening in cairo. now egypt will reportedly be agreeing to oversee this plan which is said to include an easing of the crossroads into gaza. so peace appears to be eminent but what do you make of the transparency of what the outline of it deal is? >> well, i think we still need to see it implemented. having spent a lot of time in the middle east, done a lot of negotiations, one thing i know about this part of the world, nothing is concluded until you actually see it carried out. it's one thing to talk about it. it's something else to do it. so let's actually see the ceasefire take hold. what i'm hearing is that by midnight their time, which would be around 5:00 our time, that's when it might actually take hold. so if it does, that will be the first step. then the question will be how real is it, number one. number two, what are its real elements? if there is some easing of movement into gaza, what are the commitments that hamas is undertaking to ensure there will not only be no fire out of gaza but also is there
that year coming up just a week later, israel invaded egypt. and they did it with the secret support of two major u.s. allies. france and england. it was a fight over control of the suez canal. the american president at that time, in 1956, was, of course, dwight eisenhower. republican. he was running for re-election against the democratic candidate that year, adlai stevenson. talk about an october surprise. that year it was eight days before election day. both candidates are forced to deal with an unexpected and genuine giant foreign policy crisis. >> on sunday the israeli government ordered total mobilization. on monday, their armed forces penetrated deeply into egypt and to the vicinity of the suez canal, nearly 100 miles away. and on tuesday, the british and french governments delivered a 12-hour ultimatum to israel and egypt, now followed up by armed attack against egypt. the united states was not consulted in any way about any phase of these actions. nor were we informed of them in advance. >> president eisenhower sounding kind of mad, right? the u.s. had not been informed about the at
krueger. clashes in cairo today, more protests in tahrir square against egypt's president morsi. we'll have a live report. move over george clooney the on yan's kim junge un the sexiest man alive and beijing doesn't get the joke. good day, i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. no joke today on capitol hill. ambassador susan rice's attempt to clear the air with republicans over benghazi did not work as the white house had hoped. senators mccain, ayotte and graham say they have more questions than they had before rice's comments about benghazi. >> we are significantly troubled by many of the answers that we got and some that we didn't get it. >> if you don't know what happened just say you don't know what happened. people can push you to give explanations and you can say i don't want to give bad information. >> that's troubling to me as well, why she wouldn't have asked, i'm the person that doesn't know anything about this, i'm going on every single show. >> joining me now for our daily fix, chris cizilla, msnbc contributor managing editor of post politics.com and our own nbc capito
's go new to egypt where there's another political crisis brewing and some of it is taking place exactly where the arab spring started. got new video to share with you here of opponents demonstrating against president mohamed morsi's decision to broaden his power. it is the second day of protest. nbc's jim maceda is live for us in cairo. jim, good day to you there in cairo. what's going on this morning? >> hi there, alex. it's kind of a festive atmosphere down below me there on tahrir square. several hundred people chanting, marching, but the flag -- the tents are out. some of the stands are out. the tea man is out. it's a bit reminiscent of how it was almost now two years ago. and egyptians, you know, seem more divided than ever, alex. for many here their elected leaders -- or i should say the elected leader morsi himself has just driven a wedge deeper and even wider. at dawn there were more tents than protesters on tahrir square. ground zero for last year's uprising. but that didn't stop clashes with police on approach roads where protesters blocked traffic, defying president mohamed m
hillary clinton has obviously been very busy moving between jerusalem, the west bank, egypt. nbc's stephanie gosk is live in tel aviv. what are you hearing about the cease fire? >> reporter: you know, we were on the cusp of a cease-fire it seemed like last night and it seemingly fell apart. however, we did hear from israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu that they still want a diplomatic solution, which is a real sign that at the very least the negotiations are still going on. we know that secretary clinton is shuttling back and forth throughout the region trying to make that happen. it's complicated today, chris, by this bus blast in jerusalem. there were at least 11 people injured, several of them seriously. officials here are calling it a terrorist attack although not a suicide attack. and as you know, it will be a familiar scene on the ground here in israel for people in tel aviv and all across the country. this was a tactic used a lot by palestinian militants about a decade ago. in recent years they haven't seen it. the last bus blast was back in 2004. and just soon after
after it began. the truce was brokered by egypt and ended eight days of fighting. the big question is, will it last. we have reporters throughout the region for you. martin fletcher is in tel aviv, and jim is in cairo. but we begin in gaza. this truce was marked by a huge celebration there in gaza today. tell us about it. >> that's true. in fact, tens of thousands of palestinians showed up in gaza city. and actually in cities all across the gaza strip to hear from various leaders of all of the palestinian factions. the biggest one was by far and large in gaza city. some leaders we haven't heard in the past eight days, many in hiding, came out today to address the thousands of people who gathered. they're portraying this and describing this as a victory. they say for the first time hamas has not only defeated israel, but has also shown the world what they're about against a back drop of changes taking place all across the arab world. they also sent a message to the united states saying that they should, the united states should support the palestinian people and not the occupation. ham
's strategic interest, is also important to egypt. they have a very difficult time in economic terms, and let's not forget that the revolution there was indigenous, it was local and it was, in large part, over domestic issues, jobs, education, health care, what concerns people everywhere. he needs a stable situation there. he needs to concentrate on economic growth, providing jobs. he obviously has to recognize and acknowledge public opinion, which is an important factor there as here. but, for now, i think it's a positive step. what he's done with respect to the ceasefire. >> you saw a reporter in gaza who talked about the many celebrations throughout the day on thursday there. has hamas emerged stronger from this last eight days of the conflict? there are those who suggest that's the case? >> clearly, yes. and a dangerous signal is being sent throughout the entire region. palestinians are split. the palestinian authority, which controls the executive branch of government as a result of their election several years ago, is opposed to violence. they took the position we favor, nonviolent nego
and israel, that eight-day bombardment of rockets going back and forth and egypt having to step in to broker a peace deal, do you think that if the u.n. recognizes statehood that palestine and palestinians and israeli negotiations would be better suited to coming up to a longer standing two-state solution? >> to get a state that will have only through negotiations. they know it. we know it. united states knows it. all the europeans know it. after the operations in gaza they feel maybe -- they have to encourage him and do everything to -- maybe help him. they had like to help him by the recognition today. it's a meaningless resolution. to get a state should be only through negotiations. all of us knows it. we are trying to negotiate with them since we took power. not only us. the former prime minister offered them almost everything. 98.5% of the territory. they didn't say yes. when barak was prime minister of israel, he offered the same to arafat and arafat said yes -- said no. so now since we took power, they put any obstacle they could in order to resume the negotiations. first they ask pri
that country. in egypt a scene of devastation at a railroad crossing after a train hit a bus caring kindergarten students. the government says 49 children are dead, 18 others hurt. >>> back in this country, the coast guard is still searching for two oil rig workers after yesterday's explosion and fire on a platform in the gulf of mexico. >>> a 20-year-old missouri man is facing charges for an admitted plot to want a shooting spree at a theater showing the new twilight movie. the man's mother contacted police after she discovered he bought weapons like the ones used in the colorado movie theater massacre. >>> nfl great mike ditka say his doctors say he suffered a very minor stroke. ditka was playing cards yesterday when he suddenly had trouble speaking and using his hands. espn analyst says he feels good right now and it's not a big deal. and those are your fast five headlines. >>> we have this breaking news. israel and gaza exchange rocket fire for the fourth straight day. new video from the ground in gaza shows the damage from the israeli warplanes and other missiles. the warplanes
down with egypt's president in cairo. we'll be following that as well. >>> all right. coming up on "morning joe" -- former national security adviser dr. brzezinski. hardball's chris mathews, dan senor back on the show, and actor john o'hurley will be here with two special guests to preview thursday's popular national dog show. up next, mike allen with this morning's politico playbook. but first, bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> good wednesday pomonk to you. busy travel day. the last thing we needed was a large area of the country with heavy fog. i expect significant problems in the midwest. the northeast, clouds are moving out, just like yesterday in many areas. no travel concerns whatsoever for all of the busy i-95 cities. airports are off to a good start and they should remain that way during the day. of course be there can be some volume issues because of so many people. that's about it. nice forecast and the winds should remain light. your flight should be a relatively uneventful flight in the eastern seaboard. to the problem area, areas of gray, dense fog adviso
for themselves. when you look at nations in transition like afghanistan and egypt, people there say they're concerned more about continuity and aid. they have worries about what getting to know a new administration would mean for them. in europe, it's about economic growth. in fact, a poll was done across europe showed 75% of europeans would choose obama, in places like germany, 92%. if you look at israel, say, the landslide there if the election happened there would be romney's. there's been a lot of support for him after he visited and he's expressed vocal support for any potential israeli action against iran's nuclear facilities. veroni veronica? >> interesting. michelle kosinski, we appreciate it. >>> msnbc will have special edesk day coverage throughout the day tomorrow. we'll bring you the best primetime coverage at 6:00 eastern with rachel maddow and chris matthews. >>> and now for a look at the weather and that nor'easter that's headed our way. nbc meteorologist bill karins is down in democracy plaza for us. he got the good assignment this morning. >> good monday morning. a beaut
there in the middle east. you've got syria, the iranian nuclear thing, the constitutional struggle with an egypt. you potentially have jordan getting in the mix. plus you've now got the oldest of the issues, the israel israeli/palestinian issue. this is facing barack obama at a time he wants to do more in asia, deal with the fiscal cliff. welcome to your second term. >> a lot to do. richard haa ss. >> how did jerry adams do it? how did the irish terrorists as they were called before the peace deal, how did they not only enforce the peace but then turn to their own bad elements and say, step out of line, and we're going to crush you. >> one was, they couldn't shoot their way to power. tony blair, the irish prime minister gave them a political path that was legitimate. there was a potential there for compromise. they had discipline in their own ranks. >> how did they do that? how would hamas discipline the extremists? >> at some point -- listen, in the history of every opposition movement, there's a time when there's a civil war where people who want to compromise have to deal with the radicals who don
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

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